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Staatsministerium für Umwelt und Landwirtschaft
The RevieRwasseR-
laufansTalT waTeR-
sToRage neTwoRk
in fReibeRg
Masthead
Publisher
Landestalsperrenverwaltung des Freistaates Sachsen
Bahnhofstraße 14, 01796 Pirna, Germany, Tel.: +49 (0) 3501 796-0, Fax: +49 (0) 3501 796-116
E-Mail: presse@ltv.sachsen.de, Internet:
www.talsperren-sachsen.de
(No access for electronically signed as well as for encrypted electronic documents.)
Editors
Press and Public Relations Department
Copy Deadline
July 2009
Photographs
Landestalsperrenverwaltung des Freistaates Sachsen, Kirsten J. Lassig
Circulation
1,000 copies
Design
Heimrich & Hannot GmbH
Printing
Lößnitz-Druck GmbH, Radebeul
Paper
100 % chlorine free bleached
Note
This informational brochure is published by the Saxon State Government in the scope of its
public relations work. It may not be used by parties or campaign aids for the purpose of election
advertising. This is valid for all elections.
The water-storage network for mining in Freiberg
an important provider of drinking and
industrial water for the region
The water-storage network is of extreme importance today for the
industrial- and drinking-water supply for the regions of Chemnitz,
Dresden and Freiberg. Since 1968 the former beginning of the water-
storage network has been flooded by the drinking-water reservoir.
From there the water can be transferred to the Saidenbach reservoir
through Dörnthaler Lake when needed and used to supply Chemnitz
with drinking water. It is also possible to send water from Upper
Großhartmannsdorfer Lake to the Lichtenberg reservoir using a pres-
sure line set up in 2001. This also supplies Dresden and the Freiberg
area with drinking water. And Freiberg industry is also a large con-
sumer of industrial water from the water storage network.
Today the entire water-storage network system is protected as a
technical monument. Most of the lakes are also conservation areas
due to the existence of rare fauna and flora around them. Other
facilities serve to protect fish or are open for tourism. Several natural
swimming areas and other attractive recreational opportunities lure
day-trippers to idyllic landscapes of lakes and ponds.
outdoor swimming pool, erzengler lake
fish harvest,
upper großhartmannsdorfer lake
Freiberg
Brand-Erbisdorf
Großhartmannsdorf
Dörnthal
Sayda
Rechenberg-
Bienenmühle
Neuhausen /
Erzgebirge
Rauschenbach Dam
Freiberger Mulde
Flöha
1
2
3
A
B
C
D
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Lichtenberg Dam
Lichtenberg
man-made trench
water gallery
water pipeline
A Zethauer Trench
B Müdisdorfer Trench and Water Gallery
C Kohlbach Trench
D Hohbirker Trench
1
Dittmannsdorfer Lake
2
Dörnthaler Lake
3
Obersaidaer Lake
4
Upper Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
5
Central Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
6
Lower Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
7
Erzengler Lake
8
Rothbächer Lake
9
Mill Lake
10
Konstantin Lake

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parallel to this was the construction of man-made trenches and water
galleries according to the ideas of engineer Martin Planer. It was then
possible to enlarge the amount of water available for the Freiberg
mines.
Expansion of the system was ended for the time being with con-
struction of the Upper Großhartmannsdorfer Lake from 1591 to
1593 and the crossing of the drainage divide between the Freiberger
Mulde River and the Flöha River. Plunder and destruction during
the Thirty-Year War (1618 – 1648) paralyzed the mine and with it
the water supply. The mine got running at full capacity once more
in 1684 and the “Electorate Tunnel and Water Gallery Administration”
was founded – the predecessor to the water-storage network. The
existing facilities were repaired and expanded. During the 18th
century, Central Großhartmannsdorfer Lake, Obersaidaer Lake and
Dörnthaler Lake came into being, with Dittmansdorfer Lake following
in 1828. This also meant expanding the system toward the Flöha.
Despite the advent of the steam engine, hydraulic power remained
in use in Freiberg. The system was completed for the time being in
1882 with a water abstraction system on the Flöha and an addition to
the Rothschönberger tunnel, the new, deep drainage tunnel.
By 1900, however, the Freiberg silver ore mine was becoming
increasingly unprofitable, and it was gradually phased out. The water-
storage network was therefore given a new function in 1914: In
“Three-Brothers Shaft” and in “Constantin Shaft” two of the world’s
first underground hydroelectric power stations were built. Now the
system was no longer maintained for mining but rather to produce
energy for the region. The 272-meter-deep power plant in “Three-
Brothers Shaft” supplied power up until 1972. Since then efforts
have been made to start it up again, at least as a museum.
The system known as the “Revierwasserlaufanstalt Freiberg“ is
made up of a broadly complex network of water galleries and man-
made trenches. Its 70-kilometer length connects a total of ten lakes.
The facilities began in 1524 between Freiberg and Neuwernsdorf near
the Czech border and are still being developed today.
The origin of the water-storage network is closely tied to mining in the
Ore Mountains. In 1168 silver was found near Freiberg, and mining
followed quickly thereafter. Silver accumulated near the surface and
could be extracted without much effort. But between the 15th and
16th centuries, the deposits were exhausted. From then on the miners
had to follow the lodes deep into the earth, making it necessary to
drain the mining system. Hydraulic power supplied the energy for
this. It was also used to carry rocks to the stamping mills and wash-
eries and for processing. Due to the enormous water demand, above-
ground reservoirs, called mining lakes, eventually were created.
The systematic expansion of a reservoir and supply system for Frei-
berg mining and metallurgy began with an order from the electorate
on 23 January 1558. Starting with the Mill Lake at Münzbach, various
lakes gradually were either reinforced or created for the mines. These
include the Lower Großhartmannsdorfer Lake, which existed before
1524, as well as man-made lakes such as Lother Lake, Rothbächer
Lake and Erzengler Lake at Münzbach. Beginning in 1562 and running
Technical and historical data
The waTer-sTorage neTwork for mining in freiberg
Location
Freiberg, Ore Mountains
Lake
Time of consTrucTion
Dittmannsdorfer Lake
Dörnthaler Lake
Obersaidaer Lake
Upper Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
Central Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
Lower Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
Erzengler Lake
Rothbächer Lake
Konstantin Lake
Mill Lake
1826 –1828
1842 –1844
1728
1591 –1593
1726 – 1732
1567 –1568
1569 –1570
1569
1921 –1922
1555 –1558
sTrucTure
Highest dam
Dörnthaler Lake
17,2 m above valley bottom
Largest reservoir
Lower Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
1,68 million m³
Longest dam
Central Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
632 m
Largest inflow
Dittmannsdorfer Lake
4,79 million m³/year
1 Lodes
2 Shaft and conveyor channels
3 underground water wheel, reversible
water wheel, as conveyor, water capstan,
water-capstan shaft house
4 Hand winch coe
5 Meeting houses
6 Powder storage
7 Stamp mill and washery
8 Man-made lake
9 Man-made trench
10 Mouth of water galleries
11 Mouth of supply water gallery for water
capstan
12 Mouth of the drainage water gallery of the
water capstan
13 Waste dump on the lode
The water supply of an historical ore mine
konstantin lake
Gimmlitz
Konstantin Lake
Mill Lake
Rothbächer Lake
Erzengler Lake
Lower Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
Central Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
Upper Großhartmannsdorfer Lake
Dittmannsdorfer Lake
Oversaidaer Lake
Dörnthaler Lake
Lower RWA
Upper RWA
Lichtenberg Dam
Freiberger Mulde
Rauschenbach Dam
Flöha
Freiberg
The Revierwasserlaufanstalt in freiberg
– a historical water-storage system for
mining in the ore Mountains